Soul Settlers

It’s simple, but true …

Many of us have several children. God has one Son. Just one. He sent Him to die. The previous three sentences — just 11 words — hold many truths from God’s Word. They are simple, but staggering, plain, but potent.

It seems that God prefers the simple and plain. He is grand and glorious, yet shares His love and truth in ways that are well within our reach. I am grateful for that. Consider the announcement of the birth of Jesus. It was delivered by an angel, regal and resplendent, to … shepherds. Simple shepherds. In those times shepherds were humble folk, the least and lowly. If Bath and Body Works released a Christmas candle in tribute to those shepherds it would be called, “Reeking Ragamuffins.” And, those fellows were chosen as the first to hear of the birth of our Savior. Grin, smirk even, because that is how God works. He bypasses the lofty bee-lines right to the regulars, regular folks knee deep in need and steeped in stress. I would guess that you are catching the lyrics and picking up the tune here. God comes to the common and coarse. That’s us.

Soak in one of Jesus’ first sermons. It was fulfillment of Isaiah 61:1-2 as well as the proclamation of the mission of Jesus. It is the Gospel unpacked and applied:

“And he came to Nazareth, where he had been brought up. And as was his custom, he went to the synagogue on the Sabbath day, and he stood up to read. And the scroll of the prophet Isaiah was given to him. He unrolled the scroll and found the place where it was written, “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty those who are oppressed, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.” And he rolled up the scroll and gave it back to the attendant and sat down. And the eyes of all in the synagogue were fixed on him. And he began to say to them, “Today this Scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing.” Luke 4:16-21

Please re-read it slowly. Read it aloud. Breath it in. It’s direct, and directed to us. It is God through Christ focusing His favor on rag-tag folks. Hear the heart and mission of Jesus spoken plainly:

  • He came to proclaim and purchase redemption, forgiveness, and salvation.
  • He came to repair broken hearts and lives.
  • He came to untether the tangled.
  • He came to open eyes to Truth and hope.
  • He came to bend open the bars and usher us to freedom.
  • Then, He said, “this is why I am here.”

To summarize each and all of those — He came to save us. He came to save us from our sins, our struggles, and … ourselves. God’s great gift is salvation through His Son. Though it came at a great price, it is freely offered.

Please pardon the solemn tone of this post. Christmas is joyful, a time of celebration, but remember, it was costly. Embrace the problem of our sin and separation from God. Embrace Jesus’ stepping from heaven to here, a demotion on all counts. Embrace His teaching, His death, His love in both.

As you enjoy your children this Christmas recall that God only has one Son. His Name is Jesus. He sent Him to die. Now, we can be God’s sons and daughters. Embrace your adoption into His family.

Embrace the Gift. Embrace Him …

Merry Christmas to you all!

Happy Birthday to our Redeemer-King!

Simple life in Christ

Picking out splinters and pushing ahead …

Closing out the year and preparing for a new one is exciting. We recall fond memories and fine times hoping for more to come. Oftentimes, as we look back on the best of times other thoughts slink in, thoughts that dim the outlook of the future. It happens to all of us.

Fortunately, there is an antidote for the poisonous thoughts of the past as well as strength for surging ahead. It’s found in Philippians 3:12-13:

“Not that I have already obtained this or am already perfect, but I press on to make it my own, because Christ Jesus has made me his own. 13 Brothers, I do not consider that I have made it my own. But one thing I do: forgetting what lies behind and straining forward to what lies ahead,”

Re-read those words long ago penned by Paul. He wrote them while in prison. He wrote them as one who had known ups and downs, successes and failures. Now, re-read those verses again knowing that a man, just like us, in a hard place, just like we experience, wrote them. It amplifies their message, it concentrates their potency.

Through Paul, God gives us these verses as some of the most powerful and penetrating truths in regard to how to handle the past and the future. Let’s take in these spiritual truths — which also apply to the rest of life — one by one.

First, Paul shows us that growth is a process, not an event. He stated that he had not “obtained this” or become complete, yet. All growth is a process. Often, it is more gradual and tedious than we prefer. Progress in your spiritual life, at work, regarding health, or in relationships moves in inches, not feet. Paul knew that he had not reached his goals, and that it would require ongoing effort and dedication to become who Christ wanted him to be. The same is true for us. We must resolve in our minds that growth takes time, and then set our minds to moving on.

Speaking of moving on, Paul outlines a second truth that tempers us for growth. His response to not being where he wanted to be resulted in this determined statement in verse 12, “but I press on …” Paul was a Christian who was full of grace and grit! He would press on! We must press on, too. That is the solution to many of the down times, or mediocre times in life. When you do not feel like reading your Bible, or exercising, or overcoming a bad habit, press on anyway. You might be asking, “how do I press on, or how can I press on?” Glad that you asked.

Verse 12 reveals how Paul could press on in the toughest of times (remember, he was in prison). God provides a two-sided key to unlock our chains so that we can press on.

First, remember that you belong to Christ and are empowered by Him. Pressing on is not possible without realizing and relying upon this. Paul said that he could press on because, “Christ Jesus has made me his own.” Don’t miss that one. Because Christ has made us His own He will also provide what we need. Hope, strength, grace, and discipline are all gifts that He offers to His own. When you lack, ask. He provides abundantly.

Second, Pressing on requires moving on. Paul described moving on as “forgetting what lies behind and straining forward to what lies ahead.” Stumbles from the past — whether recent or long ago — can cripple growth in the present. Whether it was a recent bad moment, or a tragic event long ago, the past can paralyze the present, and assassinate the future. How many times have past struggles or shortcomings caused you to lean back from a challenge? We all have. It’s part of being human. But, it’s a dragon that can be tamed, and banished. It is defeated by trusting God through Christ to forgive us and to empower us to forget the past. Quick question: Why do we continue to recall and relive a past that God has already forgiven? Hmmm, it’s worth pondering. Back to the point. Paul moved ahead by moving on. Paul had plenty to forget, and he did so through Christ. Forgetting isn’t the whole solution, pressing on also requires “straining forward.” What a great picture! Paul tells us to forsake and forget the past and to strain, or press, ahead. I began running in 2016. It has given me new appreciation for this verse. In many 20K or half marathon races over the past year I have had to “strain ahead” toward the finish line. As you near the end the miles seem longer, not shorter, and more difficult. That is when we have to strain ahead, press on, grit it out. Whether you are running life on tired legs, carrying a heavy heart, or nursing a bruised soul you must push on.

In the verses that we have considered we have seen that God gives us the key to growth: forget the past and press on toward the future. Just in case we didn’t get the idea Paul begins verse 13 with “I press on … “ You get it. God wants us to move on from the past, it’s hurts, and the inner voice that continually brings them up. Forget the past, push toward the future. The future, including the next year, next day, and next hour are full of God’s mercy, forgiveness, and grace. You are powered by Christ to forget and press on. What are you waiting for? Go on!

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from the Ole Bearded Acorn!

Bible study, Non-linear life, Wild seeds

Look, and see ….


It happened yesterday — a minuscule moment hidden in a dandy day. I almost missed it.


Yesterday was one of those days that started out wonderfully and grew better by the hour. Emma, our oldest daughter, and I woke up before dawn to get ready for the Little Rock Marathon 10K race. It was our first 10K together, as well as our first road race (the others have been trail races, we are more naturally suited to off-road, root-and-rock-hopping, hill-scrambling sorts of races). We were excited, to say the least.


The cold air that greeted us as we left our hotel did not deter us. We knew that we would warm up soon enough. As we lined up with the 3,000 other participants in the 5/10K we encountered friends from our hometown and my workplace. As a dad-and-daughter running team we were glad to start the race alongside a coworker and friend of mine who was running with her daughter as well (a shout out to Robin and Hannah for a race well run!).


During the race Emma and I talked, ran with other home town folks for a bit, laughed, thanked volunteers along the way, talked even more (she is a teenage girl, after all) encouraged each other, and looked forward to a big post-race breakfast. As we neared the finish we kicked it into high gear — high gear is required for me to keep up with Emma as she approaches the finish line. We finished at the same time, enjoyed post race pictures, and collected our medals for completing the race. Soon after, we found out that of 1600 10K participants we had outrun 1197 of them. To add to our excitement we also learned that Emma had won 3rd place in her division! Make no mistake, this paragraph does function to build the narrative to the point of this post, but it also serves a huge, and well-placed, “dad brag.”


Sporting our medals and salty with sweat we made our way back to the hotel for showers and breakfast. We later checked out of the hotel and ran a few errands before heading home. Then, it happened. We stopped at a garden center/nursery in North Little Rock. As I browsed for a new plant for my office Emma said, “Dad, let me have your phone.” One never knows what is on a teenager’s mind when that request is made. She took my phone and began taking pictures of plants. She hunkered down over a few that I had already moved past. Then, smiling from ear to ear — a smile that will soon feature braces — she revealed her pictures. I was stunned.  One of her pictures stopped me in my tracks, which wasn’t difficult considering how stiff I had become after the race. I lingered on her photo, savored it, and admired her eye for beauty and ability to capture it. Her is Emma’s picture:





If I offered a title to this picture it would be “God’s Hidden Jewel.” Here’s why. I had walked past that tiny plant saucering a single drop of water. I hadn’t noticed it at all. Emma had. She had spotted it right away, and then acted on her excitement in seeing it. What a life lesson. How often do I walk by these God-saturated moments and gifts? Each of the many times that I have looked at her picture I have been reminded to slow down, focus my attention, and spot the “hidden jewels” along each day’s path. A child’s giggle, an encouraging word, or a lavender sunset are grace-gifts from our Heavenly Father that can slip by us if we are not on the ready.


“Oh, taste and see that the LORD is good!” exclaimed the Psalmist in Psalm 34:8. The lesson gleaned from yesterday was “Look, and see that LORD is good!” Sometimes the biggest part of the day lies outside of the most exciting moments, and is hidden among the smaller ones.


As I pondered this lesson another passage of Scripture sprang to mind:
“Truly, I say to you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God like a child shall not enter it.” (Luke 18:17)


A simple, and stern, reminder. We come to Christ and into His Kingdom with “child-like” faith. We also recieve God’s gifts as children do — in humble, simple, grateful trust in our Father in Heaven. This reminds us that in order to recognize God’s gifts, and to walk through each day at His pace, we would do well to observe how our children move through moments. As they stop and gasp in wonder, so should we. They miss nothing, neither should we.


Today, and tomorrow, let’s set our minds to walk at a child’s pace, to look, and to see …

Uncategorized, Wild seeds

A perfect day is a gift from a perfect God


It’s been said that a picture is worth a thousand words. The picture below is evidence of the truth of that statement. As you would expect, there are many words, and entire stories, pulsing through this picture.



Let me share a few of them. I do so to highlight the principle that we should make the most of each day, and in doing so thank God for His daily gifts. This principle sings loudest this time of year. Friends and families spend more time and more focused time together around Christmas. This picture will remind me to do that with greater frequency well after the Christmas season and long into the New Year.


I also share this picture and posting to brag on Emma, our oldest daughter. To not brag on her would mean that I am remiss in my role as a doting dad.


Last August I began running on a regular basis. Prior to this I had only run every-now-and-then. By that I mean I ran if chased by our kids, our dogs, or an occasional nagging notion that I should exercise more. One of my commitments for this year was to exercise more. After a short time Emma took an interest in running with me. We officially began trail running — running off-road in the woods — the first week in November. We quickly set a goal to train for the Mt. Nebo Bench Trail Run on December 17. It is a 7K (4 mile) trail run around Mt. Nebo. It only gave us six weeks to prepare. We trained hard, and, we had a lot of fun together in the process. We enjoyed daughter and dad talks as we ran (she did most of the talking, I was too out of breath to talk most of the time). While running one cold, rainy night we also found and “rescued” a kitten. You get the picture. It was terrific fun running and training together.


Yesterday was the big day. It was our first “race” ever (although Emma had done some 5K walk/runs with her mom in the past). We got up at 5 a.m, fixed our “runner’s breakfast,” and loaded up for a 2.5 hour drive. On the way we laughed, talked, and planned our race strategy. For the sake of brevity, and to not test your patience, I will highlight the stories captured by the picture in bullet points:

  • As the race began we kept our pace and watched those around us. We came up with code words for passing certain people — for example, “Code Red” meant we would track down and pass the fellow in red who was just ahead of us for most of the race.
  • As we approached and passed a fellow runner (a woman in her 50s.) Emma said, “I have to tell you that you smell great!” The lady appreciated the comment and replied, “So, I don’t smell to perfumy or strong?” “No,” Emma replied, “you smell very clean, just right.”
  • While other runners grabbed and chugged the water from a volunteer at the halfway point Emma preferred that we stop, enjoy our water, and thank the volunteer for being there. Emma also took the time to put our paper cups in the trash bag (she was appalled that other runners threw their cups on the ground; I later told her that the volunteers would pick them up).
  • As we neared the finish we turned on our “deer legs” for the last big hill and later Emma used “cheetah legs” (more of our code talk) to try to track down a another runner who had stayed ahead of us the entire time. It is worth noting that it was no small effort to catch up to people that we had passed prior to the “water break” and overtake them a second time.
  • Emma finished 12 seconds before I did, thanks to her “cheetah mode.” When I heard them announce her name over the PA system as she crossed the finish line my heart and eyes welled up. She had done it. A 7K trail run full of hills and slippery paths couldn’t stand up against her young legs and strong will.
  • As I crossed the finish line she high-fived and hugged me. We had finished, shaved 30 seconds per mile off of our training times, and logged one of our best experiences ever.




On the way back home we replayed the day, planned our next race, and talked about seeing the new Star Wars movie. She soon fell asleep. As I drove I could only think, “Thank you God, thank You for Emma and for a day like today.” As I bathed in the delight of the day I remembered that this very sense of delight is the delight that God has in us as His children. What a wonder. What a God. What gifts He gives.


As you think on these words, and smile at the photos, think beyond them. Think beyond them to the gifts that God gives to you. Then, think beyond the gifts that He gives and enjoy Him. His gifts are great; He is greater.


His greatest gift to us isn’t our children, or our best days, it is His Son for us and in us each day!


By the way, Emma won third place in her division. I couldn’t resist … Merry Christmas from the ole Bearded Acorn!

Bible study

New and Improved, hopefully…


With only seven weeks left in 2016 it seems fitting to place the events of the year on the scale and weigh them out — a time to evaluate and enjoy them. This Bearded Acorn post will have a more personal tone than usual. That is deliberate. You will find out why later on.


This year has been a splendid year: our daughters growing and becoming more wonderful and fun, and wonderfully fun, day by day, as well as a new role at work. And, lots of life unfolding in the cracks in between. As a plan-focused sort of fellow, please allow me to list some washouts and winners from the previous ten months.


Here they are, in no particular order:

  • Reading through the Bible in a year: Check! The One Year Bible is a great tool for this; add it to your wish list for Christmas.
  • Longer, “better” times of prayer: Check. But, the more we grow in prayer the more that we will feel compelled to grow further. It was a solid step in the right direction, many more steps required.
  • Carving out more quality time for and making more memories with family: two steps forward, half step back. That’s how parenting goes, especially with a teenager. But, it was the best year ever. Lots of laughter, trips, and “projects.”
  • Healthy eating: Check, sort of. I have eaten more fruits and vegetables, gotten plenty of fiber each day, and cut back on fried foods. Mostly. Still work to do here. I know, you are all very proud of my increased fiber intake. (Note: there were six different jokes that I typed in after that last sentence. I deleted them all. Let’s move on.)
  • Become a better listener: Uhhhh…, what did you just say? Can you repeat that? There’s work to do on this. James 1:19 leaps to mind here.
  • Speak less: Score! I know, some of you are scratching your heads, but you don’t know how much I actually wanted to say.) James 1:19 again.
  • Regular exercise: Four gold stars on this one. I started with yoga (Christian yoga, no chanting thanks), and added running, then moved up to trail-running. I feel better than I have in two decades.
  • Spending more time outdoors: Yahtzee! Even though the weather wasn’t kind, the effort was made and it was worth it.


There you have it … an unsolicited peek into the personal life of an unusual fellow. Now, on to the greater matter, a sketch of what I learned from all of this. Here it is encapsulated in two verses:


“Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen.” Hebrews 11:1

“The works of the LORD are great, studied by all who have pleasure in them.” Psalm 110:2


The overarching lesson in Hebrews 11:1 drove the ability to see and live out truths learned from Psalm 110.


About faith first, each day was a reminder that we walk by faith, not by what is visible or get-a-hold-able. But, as Christians our faith is an informed faith. God gives us promises, corrections, and direction in His Word to map our steps. Some steps are small, some are a stretch, each of them taken by faith. We have to believe God to be Who He says He is and to do what He says that He will do. It’s a daily decision to live by faith. It’s the best life.


The truths that budded on the branch of Hebrews 11:1 are found in Psalm 110:2. This verse delivers potent, but practical truths about knowing His work in our lives:


The primary lesson is that we must take delight in God’s works before we can really know them. If you think through the verse from the back to the front it becomes apparent. To take pleasure in God’s work requires attention to it. Deliberate attention. Mary Oliver once wrote, “Attention is the beginning of devotion.” As we devote our attention to what God is doing around us we can then take delight in it, and in Him.


As we become more aware and appreciative of God’s work — through disciplined attention — we will think on Him and His work more deeply. Or, as the psalmist states, we become “studiers” of God and His work. When you study and think on God’s work in your life two thoughts spring forward: “God, and His work and gifts, is spectacular,” and “I am unworthy.” Those two thoughts are the foundation of worship. Pause here…


It is after devoting attention to and taking delight in God’s works that we become better students of Him in His Word. It is through seeing, savoring, and studying that we agree with the psalmist with joy and conviction about God and His works.


Over the past ten months some goals were met while others were not. There is always next year for another good run at them. Over the past ten months I have grown in Christ and also had my share of stumbles. There is always tomorrow; His grace and mercies are new each morning (Lamentation 3:22-23).


You might wonder why I am writing about the previous year in November instead of late December. The answer: I wanted to get this rolled out so that it can prepare the way for several posts that will close out the Bearded Acorn’s year. Those posts will build upon the truths shared in this one.


So, in summary, what should you take away from this fairly structured stack of sentences? Set some goals, walk by faith, devote more attention and “study” to God and His works, and eat more fiber!


Enjoy the next seven weeks my friends. What can surpass autumn scenery, cool weather, the scents and sights of the holidays, laughter of loved ones, and wool socks?


Did I mention that the Bearded Acorn blog and logo is under development, and that there will be some holiday give-a-ways (think coffee mugs with the new logo)? Stay tuned…New and improved, hopefully.

Simple life in Christ

Small verse, big changes…


Autumn brings spectacular change. Falling temperatures remind us to open our windows and invite the cool air inside. Hay bales and mums decorate porches. And, of course, the leaves begin to display their fine autumnal hues. The change in the colors of the leaves is a complex bio-chemical process that boggles the mind. Thankfully, not all beautiful change is complex. In fact, deep and dynamic personal change can take place through a simple process; it is outlined in Jeremiah 26:13:

“Now therefore, amend your ways and your doings, and obey the voice of the Lord your God…”


In Jeremiah’s admonition to God’s people he described how God-honoring change takes place. Let’s take a look at it together.


First, God-honoring change requires us take a hard look at ourselves. None of us enjoys this, but it is the intial step toward lasting change. Before we can “amend our ways and doings,” you and I must compare ourselves to the standard of God’s Word. We are to not compare ourselves to others (that’s self-justification) or compare ourselves to a standard that we have no intention of keeping (that’s hypocrisy). We must compare ourselves to God’s standards. Ouch! Hold on, there is good news. The gap that exists between your everyday life and God’s eternal standards is bridged by His grace to you in Christ. So, with courage, and encouragement, go ahead and take the floodlight of God’s Word and shine it onto your thoughts, motives, and attitudes knowing that His grace covers failures and forges change.


Second, the truth about ourselves produces a desire to change our ways.  “What needs to change?” you ask. According to Jeremiah 26:13 it’s our “ways and doings.” We are to amend our ways — the way that we think and live. Once we dial in on correcting our ways we will then see a change in our deeds. To attempt to change your actions apart from changing your ways is to ignore the inner problem of our sinful nature. The Pharisees were experts at this. If you intently focus God’s Word on your mind and heart long enough your ways will begin to change, then, so will your doings.


Third, continue to focus on and follow God’s Word. That sounds easy. It’s not. Your responsibilities at work and home, activities with kids, stresses and frustrations, and tight schedule can crowd out your consistent time in God’s Word. Busyness can create an un-focused and un-still mind that is dulled to what God is doing through His Word.  Beware, unless time and attention are devoted to God’s Word each day you won’t sense His direction and walk in His “ways.” You know what becomes of your “doings” if you aren’t walking in His “ways.” We’ve all been there before.


To summarize, take an excuse-free look at yourself through the lens of the Bible, make difficult changes in your ways and doings as God points them out, and thank Him for His grace that forgives our sins and forges our change.


Thankfully, oaks and hickories do not demand to hold on to summer’s greenery. If they could, and did, we would be robbed of autumn’s splendor. Is there some of God’s splendor that you do without by holding on to your old “ways” and “doings?” It’s worth looking into…


Soul Settlers

Overcoming, in a bold yet becoming way…

Just when you were gaining ground they arrived. You know who “they” are. They are the ones who grumble and gripe. They have a dozen reasons for why something won’t work or can’t be done. You dread seeing them coming, despise hearing their droning, and are deflated when they finally move on to frustrate someone else. This type of folks has always been around. A textbook example of these cranky critics and how to overcome them is found in the Book of Nehemiah.


The theme of the book is Nehemiah’s work to rebuild Jerusalem’s walls. The book is brief, but has a bounty of lessons about life, faith, work, attitudes, and leadership. It is one of the most practical and applicable books in the Bible.


In the first two chapters we see how Nehemiah’s work and service to God began. Nehemiah had heard that Jerusalem was in great disrepair. He responded to this news by mourning for days. He then fasted, prayed, and asked God to clear the path for him to go and rebuild the walls of Jerusalem. Soon after, while doing his ho-hum job of being the cupbearer for King Artaxerxes, Nehemiah had the opportunity to gain the king’s approval to go and rebuild the walls. As a further answer to Nehemiah’s prayer King Artaxerxes even provided a letter of protection as well as the supplies for the work! A lesson here is that while you are faithful in your mundane, day-to-day role be sure to watch for God to do something astonishing. The “small” role that Nehemiah had worked in for years became the springboard for a big assignment.

As soon as God had granted Nehemiah initial, and visible, success … trouble began. Enter the professional troublemakers: Sanballat (wasn’t that the name of an 80’s pop band?) and Tobiah (the translation of that Aramaic name is “kid who never got picked for dodgeball because of his dopey name). Those two didn’t want Jerusalem restored or for Nehemiah to prosper. So they began expressing themselves as a means of depressing others. Nehemiah chapter two concludes with this passage:


“Then I (Nehemiah) said to them, “You see the trouble we are in, how Jerusalem lies in ruins with its gates burned. Come, let us build the wall of Jerusalem, that we may no longer suffer derision.” 18 And I told them of the hand of my God that had been upon me for good, and also of the words that the king had spoken to me. And they said, “Let us rise up and build.” So they strengthened their hands for the good work. 19 But when Sanballat the Horonite and Tobiah the Ammonite servant and Geshem the Arab heard of it, they jeered at us and despised us and said, “What is this thing that you are doing? Are you rebelling against the king?” 20 Then I replied to them, “The God of heaven will make us prosper, and we his servants will arise and build, but you have no portion or right or claim in Jerusalem.” Nehemiah 2:17-20


Some quick take-home, or take-to-work, application points for us:

  • Nehemiah inspired those that he would led. He encouraged them, told them what they should do, and why they should do it. Good leaders share the “why” along with the “what, and in the process lift others up rather than tearing them down.
  • At the first sign of success the nay-sayers unleashed a barrage of finger-pointing and fault-finding. Those remain the tools of the trade used by cynics today. Learning to spot these will aid you in setting your feet and standing up to scoffers. It is worth considering that sometimes the loudest and most critical doubter you hear resides within you. Recognize that self-doubt — especially if it’s constant and contrarian — is the work of your sin nature or the enemy; it’s not from God. God desires us to keep moving ahead despite doubters, both external and internal ones.
  • Nehemiah overcame the scoffers in a becoming yet bold manner: God is with us, we will keep working, and this is none of your business. A sanctified smackdown (check out the Archives for the June 5 post Words of Grace, and Granite for more on santified smart-aleckry). It’s a rousing response for your critics: God’s in it and keep your nose out of it.


As you go about your life and work please remember Nehemiah’s example of faithfulness and watchfulness while his work began and his strength and savvy  that kept the work going. Take some time this week and walk through the Book of Nehemiah. God will use it to instruct and inspire you. He might even show you how His great work flows through your daily grind…